Category Archives: Sewer Line

Plumber Terms: A to Z

Plumber terms every Homeowner should know

Plumber terms a to zPlumber terms can be confusing to many property owners. However, having some understanding of these and the associated concepts will help you maintain your home’s plumbing better and even gain insights into the various tasks that plumbers do. Here are the ABCs of plumbing that you need to know.

Absorption system

This system’s primary purpose is to boost the efficiency of a septic tank in catching/collecting solid waste.

Aerotor

Also known as baggles, aerators are used to mix both air and water in a faucet in order to reduce splashing.

Apron

This refers to the side of the bathtub that goes from the floor to the top rim.

Backflow

Backflow occurs when water from one system contaminates other parts of the main distribution system.

Backflow preventer

This refers to the device that helps prevent contamination of water between different systems.

Balancing valve

This refers to the valve connected to water heaters. It controls water flow and balances heat.

Bathroom fixtures

These refer to different devices that either supply or dispose water. These include your sink, toilets, faucets and bathtubs.

Bidet

A bidet is a bathroom fixture that is used to cleanse the body by spraying water.

Catch basin

The primary purpose of this grated container is to catch storm water run-off and prevent debris from going to natural bodies of water.

Cistern

Cisterns are storage tanks that are typically buried underground. Their main function is to collect rain water.

Corroded pipes

Pipes corrode when the water in a household has low pH.

Cross-connection

This refers to a connection that facilitates the entry of water between systems.

Cross-connection control system

This system acts as a barrier against wastewater which can contaminate other systems.

Face plate

This device can either be decorative or functional and is used in various bathroom fixtures.

Fiberglass

This refers to glass that has been ground to create fibers. It is typically used in bathtubs and shower stalls.

Flapper

Also known as flush ball, it refers to the rubber disc or ball found inside a toilet tank. It facilitates the flushing of water to the toilet tank.

HVAC

HVAC refers to heating, ventilation and air conditioning.

HDPE pipes

HDPE or high-density polyethylene pipes are used in trenchless sewer technology.

Hydro-jetting

This is a device that is used to clear blockages in pipes by using high pressure water.

Low-flow toilet

This is a type of toilet that has been built to help save water.

Pipe inspection

This system uses video in order to record the condition of drains and pipes. In turn, this allows plumbers to know the best solution to a plumbing problem.

Potable water

This refers to safe and clean water that is fit for human consumption.

PVC

PVC means poly vinyl chloride, a type of plastic often used for plumbing and drains.

Risers

These refer to metal or plastic tubes that are connected to supply stop valves.

Septic tank

This is a tank that is used to hold waste when sewer lines and distribution systems connected to treatment facilities are not readily available.

Slab leak

This condition occurs when water leaks beneath either the floor or slab foundation. It may be caused by leaks in the water line or in the sewer.

Snaking

This refers to a method used to clear blockages using a metal wire or coil.

Tankless water heater

In this type of water heater, the need for a storage tank is eliminated. Instead, water is heated as it passes through pipes.

Trenchless sewer

This is a type of plumbing technology which eliminates the need to dig up foundations or landscape when upgrading existing water or sewer lines.

Vitreous China

This is a type of ceramic material that has been treated to become non-porous. It is often used in tiles and bathroom fixtures.

Water leak

This condition occurs when water leaks from one pipe or several pipes in a plumbing system.

Other Plumbing Resources

We are just scratching the surface on common plumbing terminology. Below are some of the best resources on the web for plumbing terminology that you may need to know about.

Safe Plumbing Glossary 

PDF – Safe Water Resources 

Signs You Have a Sewer Line Problem at Home

Sewer Line Issue Surfacing?sewer problem san diego ca

Your home’s plumbing system is one of its essential parts that is often overlooked until a problem arises. It handles a wide variety of tasks, and when you have a sewer line problem at hand, basic tasks like maintaining hygiene, washing clothes and preparing meals can become complicated and inconvenient.

Left unchecked even for a short span of time, such a problem can worsen and lead to costly repairs or even a system replacement. In order to avoid these hassles, it is beneficial to constantly watch out for signs of a sewer line problem.

Your home’s plumbing system is composed of a network of interconnected pipes which wind their way into your basement and walls. This network of pipes supplies water to the kitchen, toilet and washing machine area. If you experience problems in these areas, a bigger problem can be lurking in your sewer line. In fact, a blockage in the sewer line can cause a big problem, and as such, can be considered a plumbing emergency that needs immediate attention.

Watch out for these signs and call in an expert plumber at once for sewer line repair.

Signs of blockage

This is one of the signs of a problem with the sewer line that is the easiest to spot. If you encounter this sign in various parts of the house, you need to undertake a few steps.

First, you should check the toilet. Most problems with the sewer line manifest themselves in the toilet.

Next, check the showers and tubs. In particular, look for signs like slow drainage and the buildup of water inside the tub or shower.

Other areas to check

Another sign to look out for is water coming back up in either the shower or tub after flushing the toilet. That means there is a blockage somewhere and the water that should go to the sewer cannot push through in that direction, and has to go elsewhere.

Next, check the sink near the toilet. Turn on the tap and let it run for about two minutes. After that, turn your attention to the toilet. If you notice bubbles or if the water level rises, then you have a problem with the sewer line.

You may also have a problem with your home’s sewer line if water coming out of the running machine backs up into the toilet.

If you suspect that there is a problem with your home’s sewer line and you notice any of these signs, call in a plumber to verify and give you expert help.